Tallulah Point Overlook

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While Tallulah Gorge is a natural wonder (which we will explore more on the next page), Tallulah Point Overlook is pure touristy kitsch.  It’s mostly a gift shop, but the goodies inside, the signs outside, and of course, the view of the gorge itself, make it worth a stop.

Location

Tallulah Point Overlook is located at the side of the road, on Historic US 441 (the curvy 2-lane road, which was replaced with a 4-lane highway).  There are plenty of places to access Historic 441.  The Overlook is just south of downtown Tallulah Falls, along a short stretch of the old road known as “Tallulah Gorge Scenic Loop”.

My Visit

Tallulah Point Overlook proudly proclaims itself as the only place from which you can see Tallulah Gorge, for free, from the road.  It’s been making that claim since 1912.

Alright already!

Head inside, walk past the country-store-style items that line the shelves, and head onto the back porch…

… through this door…

… for your chance to look down into Tallulah Gorge.  Try to ignore those power lines, which feel like they’re close enough that you could touch them.

You’ll probably spot some wide-winged birds of prey taking advantage of the air currents, coming up from the gorge.  Unfortunately, from here, almost every picture you take will feature those darned power lines.

During your visit, you’ll get the feeling that the biggest thing to ever happen around these parts was daredevil Karl Wallenda’s high-wire crossing of the gorge.  Tallulah Point Overlook provides plenty of historical pictures from that day in 1970, when Wallenda crossed the chasm during a quarter-mile-long wire walk.  Incidentally, Karl Wallenda wasn’t the first person to cross the gorge on a tightrope: in 1883, “Professor Leon” successfully performed the feat, as a publicity stunt for a local hotel.

Tallulah Point Overlook prides itself on offering “country store” items, that you just can’t find elsewhere.  You can check out their online store here.

Note: This trip was first published in 2006.

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